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We are one of the founding breeders of the Goldendoodle breed, the creator of the mini Goldendoodle, and founder of the Goldendoodle Association of North America, Inc. (www.GoldendoodleAssociation.com ). Our experience cannot be duplicated!

FEEDING - Your puppy has been used to having free access to dry puppy food 24 hours a day.  It is now time for your puppy to have regularly scheduled meals.  You need to offer 4 meals a day for the first two weeks - breakfast, lunch, dinner, and an evening snack.  Your puppy may only nibble at these meals or may not be interested at all in some meals.  You should make the meal available for 15 minutes.  If the bowl is emptied, offer more.  Offer water only at meal times until your puppy is going to the door to ask out.  In two weeks, eliminate the evening snack.  In another two weeks, eliminate lunch.  Your puppy should be maintained on two meals for the rest of its life.  Life’s Abundance is the food we feed and recommend.

TREATS/REWARDS – Use only treats that are nutritionally balanced.  Your puppy can easily fill up on "junk food" during training sessions.  Life's Abundance (link is on my website) has several healthy options for training treats.

THE FIRST WEEK – Your puppy can sleep through the night, but will not because of the
transition and separation anxiety it will experience when going to a new home. Crate
training is recommended and complete instructions can be found on my website – www.
Goldendoodles.net. The first night is typically the most difficult and you should see
improvement each night. You should walk your puppy as the last task before your
bedtime. Make sure you give it ample time to eliminate. Then place the puppy in its crate
with a towel or blanket and some toys. The crate should be just large enough for the
puppy to stand up, turn around, and lay down. Let the puppy cry itself to sleep. It may
wake up again and cry, but you should not take the puppy out of the crate until at least 3
hours have passed. Do not wake a sleeping puppy! Anytime after the 3 hour limit that the
puppy wakes up crying, take it out to eliminate and then put the puppy back in the crate
and let it cry. If you are consistent with this method, your puppy should be sleeping
through the night within a week (7 to 9 hours).

CRATE CONFINEMENT –  Your puppy should be placed in the crate during any unsupervised time.  The crate is used like a playpen for a human toddler.  At 8 weeks of age, your puppy is on the same level as a one year old human toddler.  One would never allow a one year old human toddler to have free range of a house or be left unsupervised for even a minute.  If your puppy has an accident that you do not catch as it is happening, do not scold the puppy, but instead, scold yourself.  The puppy only associates the scolding with the act if it is caught in the act.  Each accident that happens in the house is a step backwards in the training and should be avoided.  A puppy should not be allowed access to  the floor unless it has eliminated outside within the last 45 minutes.  This will help to avoid the accident.  If the playtime reaches an hour, the puppy should be taken outside to eliminate again.  In the crate, the limit is 3 hours, but outside the crate, the limit is one hour.  Every month, the crate time limit can be increased by one hour.

GROOMING –  Your puppy should be brushed every day if possible.  Even though you will not find tangles or mats until the coat grows somewhat, you want your puppy to be used to being brushed.  If you wait until the coat is tangled or matted, the process will not be pleasant for your puppy and you want  him/her to learn that grooming is a fun process.  As the coat grows longer and thicker, make sure you are brushing from the root out so you don’t leave mats close to the skin.  Brushes you will want to use are a slicker brush to separate the hairs and a metal comb when you are done as it will find tangles you missed.  Every day you should massage the toes gently to desensitize your puppy to make clipping nails easier.  Nails should be clipped about once a month.  When the adult coat is in (about 6 mos. of age), you will want to brush your dog completely at least twice a week, but daily is preferred.  At this time, many Goldendoodles need their first trim.  The dry, unhealthy looking puppy coat can be removed to reveal the healthy adult coat underneath.  Multigen Goldendoodles typically need to be clipped every 6-8 weeks.


Puppy Care Tips
  Click here for information on resource guarding and how to eliminate or avoid this issue.
                                                    

It is important to remember that your puppy not only learns by rewarding good behavior, but it also learns by disciplining undesirable behavior.  If there is a behavior your puppy exhibits that you may think is cute while your puppy is small, you need to think ahead and determine if this behavior will be acceptable from an adult dog.  If the answer is “No”, then you need to curb the behavior as a puppy.  Consistency is the most important tool for training a puppy.  Each family member needs to use the same techniques and commands so as not to confuse your puppy.  It is important to remember that a puppy associates a reward or a disciplinary action with its behavior in the past 3 seconds.  Waiting longer than 3 seconds to reward or discipline is very confusing to a puppy.  The following are examples of undesirable behavior and tips on how to correct this behavior:

Nipping/biting - Your puppy is teething and has an insatiable desire to chew.  You cannot stop this behavior, but you can certainly direct your puppy to chew upon acceptable items until this phase passes (at about a year of age).  The only way puppies know how to play is the typical wrestling, biting, chasing, tackling, pulling, and nipping they do with littermates.  In the absence of littermates, you and your family suddenly become the littermates.  Each and every time your puppy puts its mouth and/or teeth on your clothes or hands, you immediately need to remove the teeth from the object, firmly close the puppy’s mouth with your hand, and firmly, deeply, and loudly say “NO”.  Your puppy will undoubtedly nip/bite at you again.  Repeat this same disciplinary action a total of three times in a row.  After the third disciplinary action, distract your puppy by giving him/her something he/she can chew upon.  Every now and then, a particularly feisty puppy will become more excited by this disciplinary action and need a more distinct disciplinary measure.  This next action needs to be initiated quickly.  When the first three disciplinary actions don’t seem to work, you can use another technique that may be more successful.  Immediately upon your puppy putting his/her mouth on you, put your thumb on the tongue and your other fingers underneath the jaw and press down on the tongue.  This will be uncomfortable for your puppy.  When behavior meets with uncomfortable consequences, the behavior will stop.   Another option is to mix 30% white vinegar and 70% water in a small spray bottle.  Spray this in your puppy’s face each time he bites at you.  With all this being said, the absolute best remedy is for you to arrange daily play dates with  other puppies or young dogs.  Allowing your puppy to expend energy this way will help him/her to be much calmer the rest of the day.  The bottom line is that your puppy needs to have active playtime each day.  It is your job to find or create activities that are fun for your puppy and that tire him/her out.

Jumping - Your puppy will jump on you to get your attention.  This may seem innocent while your puppy is small, but Grandma may not appreciate being knocked over by the full grown untrained dog.  You will need to push your puppy down and say “down” firmly each time he/she jumps on a person.  Make sure you do not reward the puppy for the act of getting down as this will enforce the behavior of jumping up only to be told to get down for a reward.

Growling - Your puppy may growl at you from time to time as a way to communicate his/her dislike of something.  This is not a sign of aggression unless you allow this to go undisciplined over time.  Expressing fear when your puppy growls only teaches him/her that you back down when you hear a growl.  You need to actively discourage any and all growling directed at you.  If your puppy growls at you when you get close to the food bowl, immediately remove the food bowl and feed the puppy out of your hand.  If he/she growls when you brush him/her, scold the puppy and continue brushing.  Do not stop brushing until the puppy accepts this without growling.  If he/she growls as you are trying to take something from him/her, turn the puppy on its back and promptly take the item from the puppy.   Each puppy needs to learn its place in the pecking order of a family.  Obviously, they need to be the lowest on the totem pole.  If allowed to be boss, growling is a normal thing for a puppy to exhibit when showing its dominance.  It is easily curtailed with appropriate discipline, but many become fearful instead, adding validity to the dog's sense of his place in the family.  Each family member must establish they are boss.  This includes young children who are timid or fearful of the puppy. Remember that any behavior you allow as a puppy is then extremely difficult to curb later in life.  If you do not wish to have your adult dog on the furniture, do not sit on the sofa holding your puppy.  If you do not want your grown dog to grab your pant leg, etc., do not play tug-o-war or other aggressive games with your puppy.

     PUPPY TRAINING TIPS
     POISONOUS FOODS FOR DOGS
POISONOUS FOODS FOR DOGS

* CHOCOLATE (CONTAINS THEOBROMINE)
* ONIONS AND GARLIC
* PEAR PIPS, THE KERNALS OF PLUMS, PEACHES, AND APRICOTS, APPLE CORE          PIPS (CONTAIN CYANOGENIC GLYCOSIDES RESULTING IN CYANIDE          POISONING)
* POTATO PEELINGS AND GREEN LOOKING POTATOES
* RHUBARB LEAVES
* MOLDY/SPOILED FOODS
* MACADAMIA NUTS/WALNUTS
* ALCOHOL
* YEAST DOUGH
* COFFEE GROUNDS, BEANS, AND TEA (CAFFEINE)
* HOPS (USED IN HOME BREWING)
* TOMATO LEAVES AND STEMS (GREEN PARTS)
* BROCCOLI (IN LARGE AMOUNTS)
* RAISINS AND GRAPES (DAMAGES THE KIDNEYS)
* CIGARETTES, TOBACCO, CIGARS
* NUTMEG
* RAW POTATOES
* TURKEY SKIN
* VOLTARIN (IN ARTHRITIS MEDICATION) - VERY FATAL
* BABY FOOD (CAN CONTAIN ONION POWDER)
* CITRUS OIL
* FAT TRIMMINGS (CAN CAUSE PANCREATITIS)
* HUMAN VITAMINS CONTAINING IRON (CAN DAMAGE LINING OF THE                   DIGESTIVE SYSTEM)
* LARGE AMOUNTS OF LIVER
* MUSHROOMS
* RAW FISH.

ANIMAL POISON HOTLINE - 1-888-232-8870
Vaccination protocols have changed.  Most vaccines are no longer recommended annually. Over vaccination of dogs has been linked to cancer, over stressing the immune system, and shortenly lives.  Click here for more information.  Click here for another link to more information.
  Virtual training sessions with Tammy MacLean - Click here for more information.  This can help you get off to a good start which will insure you have a well trained dog.